Competency based interviewing HR

Competency based interviewing.

Personality type, two people

COMPETENCY BASED INTERVIEWS

Background and example questions for people interviewing for roles in Human Resources.

This white paper is designed to help knowledge workers, professionals & semi-professionals, managers and senior execs CXO level prepare better for interview – this particular article is written to help the candidate approach their interview better informed and more prepared.

Where appropriate, in each occupational discipline, we have included questions for both individual contributors and management questions for individual disciplines.

This white paper specifically addresses the issues of how-to best approach handling competency-based interviews.

Here’s what we’ve got for you:

  • What does competency-based interviewing mean?
  • How to second guess what questions may arise and how to answer them
  • Question bank – Examples of generic and specific questions you may expect

Specific competency based interview question examples for people in…

  • HR Generalist
  • Talent Management
  • Compensation & benefits
  • Recruitment
  • Learning & development
  • HR Legal

 


What does competency-based interviewing mean?

Competency-based interviews are structured, with the interviewer working from a set of pre-determined questions.

They work on the basis that your past performance is a reliable predictor of the future, so you can expect to be asked a number of questions that will require you to draw on specific aspects of your past performance.

Competency-based interview questions will typically begin:

  • Tell me about a time when?
  • Tell us what approach you took?
  • Describe an occasion when?
  • How did you go about?
  • Give me an example when?

These are often based around core behavioural competencies such as:

Initiative and innovation. Developing others. Delivering results.
Team leading. Interpersonal skills. Learning & self-development.
Communication Planning and organising. Analytical thinking.
Strategic thinking. Building relationships. Teamwork and collaboration.

 

However, competency-based interview questions are more likely to be put to you in a specific context, determined by the requirements of the job and what is to be accomplished / achieved.

 

Selecting your next leader

Why is it so important that you understand competency-based interviewing?

Two reasons;

Firstly, HR is increasingly becoming recognised for its contribution to the business – once a discipline which many people saw as taking a back-seat, HR as a function is becoming increasingly valued.

  • Importantly HR professionals becoming increasingly business savvy, better focused on business outcomes and more influential in driving up organizational capability through more robust recruitment and selection tactics and techniques for internal and external resourcing.
  • Best practice in HR, means leveraging a competency-based interview approach; taking a more scientific approach to determining a candidate’s ability to perform in the job and this means looking for previous experience of success (competency).
  • You can expect HR executive to be interested to identify experience which is directly relevant to the specific demands of the job, the goals to be achieved and situation in which it is to be done (business drivers, market conditions / dynamics….).

Second reason; most experienced senior managers or business leaders are either aware of the merits and rationale of competency-based interviewing or are subconsciously aware of it, and therefore will often use competency-based interview questions to assess a candidate’s real ability.

In relation to their questions, the interviewer(s) will analyse your answer around ‘what you did’, in terms of your experience, knowledge and skills applied to the situation that is in question. The question is most likely to be framed in terms of direct relevance to the organization and the job being recruited for, and you should look to answer it in the same terms.

You will demonstrate the extent of your affinity to the organization’s activities. The interviewer, and certainly if they are part of HR, will want to know ‘how you did what you did’. This relates to the behavioural competencies that are relative to the values of the organization. Are you a fit with the desired culture of the organization?

 

For more senior roles, and particularly jobs that involve people management, apart from the technical skills and general behavioural aspects, management of people is key. However, it is increasingly common for the term leadership to be used, therefore it may help to provide some delineation between the two terms.

Management is seen as the transactional processes by which an organization is steered, and its activities are planned, directed and executed procedurally.

Leadership is considered to be a more transformational activity in which influence is created and used to bring about people performance. So, we can see fundamental differences in approach – authoritarian v. charismatic, short-term objectives v. strategic vision, doing things right v. doing the right things.

Leadership is seen as much more behaviourally driven, an innate characteristic of nature rather than learned, hence it may drive competence interview questioning that has greater focus on emotional intelligence.

 

Competence questions have their foundation in the premise that how a person behaves in a given situation is characteristic, rather than what they say they would theoretically do in a given situation, which may or may not be the case in the event. At the most senior levels of an organization, the criticality of leadership will feature strongly in the manner of the competence interview questions that you will be asked, as much as your focus on past business performance.


How to second guess what questions may arise.

The keys to unlocking what competency-based interview questions you may face, lie in the following clues and combinations…

Expect questions to be focused on very predictable business-critical goals for which you will be expected to be responsible, and against which your performance will most likely be measured, and by which success or failure will be determined. These are most likely to be industry-sector and job specific. Consider what matters most in the position into which the employer is hiring – the key challenges of the role, the key issues facing the business, its ambitions and objectives. Anticipate what areas you think they are most likely to probe you about. Where does your experience and achievements relate?

You should reflect on what insight you have into the opportunity from any job spec, briefing from a head-hunter, internal recruiter, job advert, inside line from someone in your network, news items or other media items including their website, then try to second guess what questions they are most likely to put to you. Consider sitting in the interviewers’ shoes and think about what questions you might ask if you were on their side of the table.

Factors most likely to influence the shape of the competency-based interview question /s!

Take a broad view of the organization itself – its size and spread geographically, its range of products and services, its operational activities, its recent market performance, emerging issues; something of a SWOT analysis.

What will be the impacts required of the role-holder – critical short-term deliverables, long term ambitions, key areas of influence, in the context of the organization.

Now, look to define the role in terms of the important attributes (experience, knowledge, skills) that will underpin delivery of job performance. You have got to the interview stage so what is it on your CV that will likely have interested them in you.

Okay, now try to prepare and plan for the interview itself. Think about the concepts raised in the above visual and consequently which competency-based questions are they most likely to put to you.

How to answer competency-based interview questions?

Answer competency-based interview questions using the STAR formula!

  • SITUATION – say where you were (employer name), what your role was and when it happened.
  • TASK – outline the challenge or nature of the project for which you were responsible and why it was important in the context of impact on the organization.
  • ACTION – explain how you approached the task and the actions you took. If your efforts were part of a team effort, focus most on what you did, and what you contributed. Avoid saying what you thought you might do – you need to focus on what you have achieved and how you achieved it.
  • RESULT – what were the outcomes? These should be substantiated with facts and figures and should show you in a positive light.

What if you can’t think of a good or recent example?

 

In this case you may wish to tell the interviewer that you cannot think of a directly comparable situation, but you can think of something similar, and then elaborate on how you might have approached this task if faced with it. The interviewer will normally accept this approach. The length of your answer. Expect sub questions.

 

Your response to any competency-based question needs to be focused but in dealing with all four points of the STAR technique in sufficient detail, it is not untypical for a response to take around five minutes to explain. If you have not covered aspects that the interviewer is looking for you to cover, they may interject or at the end of your answer give you one or more ‘prompt’ questions but it is also common for an interviewer to give you a series of sub-questions having asked the main question, to give you a steer as to what they are looking for you to cover in your response. In answering competence-based interview questions, the process you apply is important to make sure that you give the best answers you can.

 

Having been asked the question, give yourself some thinking time so that you identify a particularly relevant scenario for your response and to prepare and frame your response so that it is comprehensive yet focused.

  • The interviewer will expect you to take time to prepare your answer.
  • Feel free to ask for the question to be repeated – you need to be certain that you understand the question.
  • Have a pen and paper to note the salient points of the question as a reminder of what needs to be addressed if you personally feel comfortable and confident in this approach.
  • If you think you may be going off track with your answer, ask for the question to be repeated – better safe than sorry.
  • Expect the interviewer to be writing notes as you talk.

 


Examples of generic competency-based interview questions

Communication and presentation skills

  • Think of a time when you tried to persuade someone else to adopt your point of view. What was the situation? How did you present your views / arguments? What was the result?
  • Tell us about a major change you have experienced in your work environment.
  • Tell us about a time when you failed. Why did you fail? What did you learn from the situation?

 

Delivering results / results orientation

  • Tell us about a project where you have persisted in spite of obstacles.
  • Tell us about a major achievement and how you went about it.
  • Describe a time when you experienced setbacks in your work.

 

Interpersonal skills

  • Tell me about a time when you needed to persuade others to commit to a course of action.
  • Describe a situation where you got people to work together.
  • Can you tell me the last time you upset someone? What happened?

 

Use of initiative

  • Tell me about a time when you undertook a project in an area in which you had little or no experience.
  • Tell me about a time when you initiated a change on your own. How did you present this to your boss?
  • Can you give me an example of a time when you wanted to initiate a project on your own? How did you go about it?

 

Planning and organising

  • Tell me about a complex project you’ve been responsible for that required significant planning.
  • Tell me about a time when you didn’t meet an objective / deadline.
  • Give me an example of a time when you have had to change your plans.

 

Analytical thinking

Tell me about a time when you identified a new approach to a problem.

Describe a time when your analytical skills were put to the test.

Tell me about the most complex or difficult information you have had to analyse.

 

Strategic thinking

  • Tell me of a time when you have influenced strategy.
  • Can you tell me about a time when you implemented a plan that had long-range implications?
  • Can you give me an example of a time when you developed a mission statement?

 

Building relationships

  • Tell me about a time when you quickly developed a relationship with a new colleague or client.
  • Give me an example of a time when you went about building good working relationships within a team.
  • Describe a situation in which you had to develop and maintain a working relationship with someone with whom you didn’t like
  • to work. How did you do that?

 

Management/influence

  • Describe a time when you have had to change a process or methodology. How did you go about it?
  • Can you describe a time when you had to influence business decisions in a business unit not directly accountable to you?
  • Describe your recent experience of partnering with senior managers to influence commercial outcomes.

 

Commercial and business awareness

  • Describe a situation where you championed strategic thinking corporately.
  • Describe financial / commercial decisions that you have made / advised on.
  • Tell us about an occasion when you borrowed ideas from other industries.

 

Decision making – problem solving and analysis

  • Tell us about a particularly difficult decision you have had to make.
  • Describe a complex problem that you have had to deal with. What approach did you take?
  • Tell us about some of the analytical methods you have used in the past, e.g. cost / benefit analysis. How have these helped you add value?

 

Team-working

  • Can you tell me about a time when you have had to resolve conflict between individuals?
  • Describe a time where you have had to use different approaches to deal with different personalities.
  • Can you describe a time when you worked in a team drawn from other departments / areas of your business?
  • Who is the most difficult person you have ever had to manage?

 

Team leading

  • Describe your approach to leadership style in your last position / s.
  • What is the best team you’ve led and why?
  • Tell me about a time when you led a dysfunctional team.
  • What techniques have you used to encourage others to contribute to the team?

HUMAN RESOURCES – EXAMPLE QUESTIONS

The candidate may be working at the highest strategic level or delivering transactional activity. Regardless of the aspect of the people agenda that they are addressing, it must contribute to the business performance.

The higher the HR ladder they seek to climb, the more that they must be able to articulate the value of any HR activity in measured terms in its contribution to the business. The business case must be there in terms of added value or mitigation of risk across resourcing, employment relations, compensation and benefits, L&D and OD.

They may be the very role model of the organization’s values, but you will also want to see the commercial clarity they possess.

In this section, you will find questions for different types of HR roles including:

 

  • HR Generalist
  • Talent Management
  • Compensation & benefits
  • Recruitment
  • Learning & development
  • HR Legal

 


HR Generalists and HR Business Partners

HR Generalist

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me what you consider to be your single most significant contribution to a business bottom-line, as a HR professional.

Sub Questions

  • What was the situation?
  • How did the opportunity come about?
  • What did you do?
  • Why do you consider it to be so significant?
  • Did you quantify the value and if so, what was it?

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when your intervention was critical in bringing about performance improvement in respect of a particular employee.

Sub Questions

  • What was the situation?
  • How did you become involved?
  • What was your view?
  • What actions did you take and how were matters progressed and concluded?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a decision you made that had a significant cost reduction impact for the business.

Sub Questions

  • What was the situation?
  • How did you see an opportunity for cost saving?
  • What actions did you take?
  • Who else needed to be involved?
  • What was the saving?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when you introduced performance management into an organization or made a significant change to the existing performance management processes.

Sub Questions

  • What prompted the development?
  • What challenges did you receive to your proposals and how did you deal with them?
  • How did you progress the implementation?
  • How measurable was the success of the change?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time that you led a major change initiative within an organization.

Sub Questions

  • What was the situation that warranted the change?
  • How did you develop your proposals?
  • What were the key elements of your plan?
  • What were the key aspects of communication?
  • How did you implement the changes?
  • How did you evaluate the contribution the change made to the business bottom-line?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about an occasion when you had a key role in a major organization re-structuring activity.

Sub Questions

  • How did the need for organization restructuring come about?
  • What was your contribution to the activity?
  • Why was your contribution significant?
  • What were the key performance indicators for a successful change?
  • How did you evaluate the level of success?

 

Management Question Set

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe the measures that you adopted within a business to quantify the value that your HR team added to the financial performance of your organization.

Sub Questions

  • What KPI’s did you consider?
  • Which ones did you use and why?
  • Which ones did you consider to be less than appropriate and why?
  • What were the wider leadership views of your approach?
  • What was your evaluation of your team’s contribution?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me how you managed the link between levels of employee engagement with line management and team performance within an organization.

Sub Questions

  • What was the general view of the concept within the leadership of the organization?
  • How did this fit with your views and how did you reconcile any difference in views?
  • How did you collect employee engagement data?
  • How were results across the organization evaluated against team contribution to organization performance?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please explain from a HR perspective, how you influenced and contributed to delivery of the overall vision for a particular organization.

Sub Questions

  • What was the organization and where did your role fit within it?
  • What was the vision of the organization?
  • What were the fundamentals of your HR Strategy and Agenda?
  • How were these aligned with the organizations vision?
  • How successful were you?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a significant and difficult change that you made within your own team.

Sub Questions

  • What was the situation that initiated your thinking?
  • What did you decide to do?
  • What were the most difficult aspects of the change?
  • How did you manage the changes?
  • How did you deal with external perceptions?
  • How would you assess the success of the changes you made?
  • Upon reflection, what would you have done differently?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please tell me about a time when negative perceptions around your team’s performance or any aspect of it within the business brought about severe pressure upon you to act and how you managed that situation.

Sub Questions

  • Where was the pressure coming from and why?
  • How was morale within the team?
  • What issues were foremost in your view of the situation?
  • How did you handle your team members?
  • How did you manage relationships with your internal customers during this period and to what extent did you engage with them to gain wide support for your actions?
  • How did you exert influence to manage the situation?

Talent Management

 

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe an occasion where you introduced an aspect of talent management that brought about a step-change in people capability within an organization.

Sub Questions:

  • Why was your intervention necessary?
  • What was your approach?
  • How were your proposals received within the organization?
  • What impact did your intervention have and how did you measure success in meaningful terms?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please tell me about a significant change in approach to succession management that you developed and implemented.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the change in approach?
  • Why did you see it as appropriate and necessary?
  • How did you manage its implementation?
  • How did you quantify the organisational benefit from the change?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about a time when you fundamentally disagreed with the view of a senior manager regarding the development potential of one of his or her team.

Sub Questions

  • How did the issue come to light and what was the situation?
  • Why did you hold such a different view of the employee’s potential?
  • How did you approach the subject with the manager?
  • How were matters resolved?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe an opportunity that you took to improve the way in which leadership potential was evaluated within the business.

Sub Questions:

  • Where were the existing processes weak?
  • What ideas did you have?
  • What resistance did you have to overcome?
  • How did you sell your approach?
  • How would you gauge the success of the changes you introduced?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please tell us about your contribution to an organization-wide mentoring scheme.

Sub Questions:

  • Why was such a scheme important in your view?
  • What was your role?
  • How did you communicate the scheme’s purpose across the population and achieve engagement?
  • What training did you provide to establish mentoring?

 

Management Question Set

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about the KPI’s that you put in place to quantify the bottom-line benefit of any talent management programme you implemented.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the specific programme?
  • What specific quantitative measures did you establish?
  • How did you benchmark the direct extent of improved business performance?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe the actions you took to get Talent Management on the agenda at the highest levels in the organization.

Sub Questions:

  • How did the organization view talent management prior to your intervention?
  • What actions did you take to promote the concept of talent management and what challenges did you face?
  • How did you build organizational commitment to your ideas?
  • What organization did you put in place to support your agenda?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me how you supported the establishment of the succession planning process and development of succession plans within the senior leadership of an organization.

Sub Questions:

  • What approach did you take to create senior level engagement?
  • How did you role model the approach to succession planning within your own team?
  • How did you measure the success of this particular activity?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Talk us through a situation where you had to redirect or influence the re-shaping of unrealistic aspirations of an ambitious team member.

Sub Questions:

  • What were his/her aspirations?
  • Why were his or her ambitions not realistic?
  • How did you approach him/her?
  • How did you help coach them to realise a change to a more realistic position?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please give me an example of where your coaching skills made a significant difference to the organization

Sub Questions:

  • Where did issues lie?
  • How did you come to be involved?
  • What did you do and what had the most positive impact?
  • What benefit was actually realized?

Compensation & benefits

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a critical pay bench-marking activity that you have undertaken.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the situation?
  • Why was bench-marking so critical on this occasion?
  • How did you identify the appropriate bench-marking approach?
  • What did the data tell you and what were your recommendations?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about an occasion when your view of a remuneration package differed significantly to the manager of the post in question.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the role and what was your view of the appropriate package?
  • What was the manager’s view and why was it so different to yours?
  • How did you resolve matters and what was the final outcome?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please talk us through a situation where a significant change in remuneration or reward arrangements had to be negotiated with a trade union or trade unions.

Sub Questions:

  • What were the proposed changes?
  • What was the nature of the organisation’s relationship with the trade union or trade unions?
  • What was your role in this scenario?
  • What did you do and what influence did you have?
  • What difficult issues did you have to deal with and how did you deal with them?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about a major change in compensation and benefits arrangements that you developed to improve the cost base of the business.

Sub Questions:

  • What opportunity did you see to bring about a major change?
  • How did you present your views and to who?
  • What were your major supporting arguments?
  • How were your recommendations received?
  • What was the business benefit realised by the change?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a situation where you were a key player in reconciling conflicting views within the business on remuneration strategies.

Sub Questions:

  • What different views existed and why?
  • How did you view the situation and why?
  • How did you seek to influence the situation?
  • What means did you exercise to reach a resolution?

Recruitment

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when you were tasked with a particularly challenging role to recruit for?

Sub Questions:

  • What was the role?
  • Why was it a difficult role to fill?
  • How did you determine the recruitment methodology and why?
  • What selection methods did you propose and why?
  • How did you rate the success of the approach?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe an occasion when you were challenged on your proposed methods of recruitment and selection?

Sub Questions:

  • Who challenged you?
  • What was the nature of the challenge?
  • What was your response and how did you justify your chosen approach?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about a time when your recruitment and selection activity failed to find a suitable candidate.

Sub Questions:

  • What role were you recruiting for?
  • What approach did you take and why?
  • What response did you get and how did you rate it?
  • What was the view of the recruiting managers?
  • How did you react and what did you learn from the event?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a major recruitment campaign that you designed and implemented.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the target audience?
  • What were the key features of your campaign?
  • Why did you see these as particularly appropriate for your target audience?
  • What would you have changed with the benefit of hindsight?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about an assessment centre that you developed and managed for a senior level appointment?

Sub Questions:

  • What was the target audience?
  • What selection activities did you include and why?
  • What selection activities did you decide not to include and why?
  • What resources did you organise to support the running of the assessment centre and how did you direct them?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe to us how you ensured that you understood the markets that the business needed to recruit in, and the type of technical skills required.

Sub Questions:

  • In what specific areas did you recognise that increased understanding or knowledge was required?
  • How did you gain your understanding and knowledge?
  • How did you evaluate the contribution of such enhanced knowledge to your recruitment and selection activities? Management Question Set

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Can you describe how you benchmarked the performance of your recruitment function against the external marketplace?

Sub Questions:

  • What did you see as the key criteria to be used for benchmarking?
  • What data did you gather internally?
  • How did you gather relevant external benchmark data?
  • What comparisons did you make and what did you learn?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe to us how you determined the strategy for recruitment around both direct recruitment and use of external recruiters.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the strategy when you took over?
  • What factors determined your philosophy in this aspect?
  • How did you engage the recruiting managers to support your philosophy?
  • What changes in recruitment performance did you achieve and what KPI’s did you use to demonstrate the shift in performance?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about how you demonstrated that your function was delivering a value-for-money approach to recruitment from its methodologies.

Sub Questions:

  • What measures did you apply to evaluate performance?
  • How did you embed these measures within the team?
  • How did you assess value against other potential methodologies?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about how you measured and demonstrated performance improvement in service delivery by your recruitment function within an organization.

Sub Questions:

  • What did you see as the key areas for performance improvement and why?
  • What did you see as the major KPI’s to measure performance?
  • What improvements did you deliver in terms of cost reduction, improved recruitment times, etc?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us what improvements you made in selection methodologies and on-boarding processes within a business and how you demonstrated the success of such changes.

Sub Questions:

  • What changes did you make?
  • What impact did the improvements have?
  • What measures did you use to demonstrate the positive impact of your changes?
  • To what extent were you able to demonstrate increased quality among your ‘hires’?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe how your approach to segmentation within the recruitment phase had a positive impact on conversion ratios throughout the selection stages and reduced rates of employee attrition.

Sub Questions:

  • How did you determine segmentation across your target recruitment audiences?
  • What sort of conversion ratios did you achieve at each stage and how do you adjudge that performance?
  • Did you have any employee attrition issues and what improvements did your resourcing approach bring?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me what Service Level Agreements you put in place with your internal customers and why?

Sub Questions:

  • What were the key elements and why were they appropriate?
  • How did you engage with your internal customers as part of assessment of performance?
  • What feedback did you provide to your internal customers?

Learning & development

 

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when the value of an L&D intervention you were championing was challenged at senior level.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the training need?
  • How was the L&D/training activity to be delivered?
  • How did you evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention?
  • How did senior management see things?
  • What was your response?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about an innovative approach that you developed to meet a particular training need.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the training need?
  • What options did you consider and propose?
  • What was innovative about your optimum solution?
  • How did you persuade others to adopt your approach?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell us about a business challenge where you saw L&D as the main focus of its resolution.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the challenge to the business?
  • What did you see as the means of resolution and why?
  • What actions did you take to progress your ideas?
  • How did things move forward?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe a major training needs analysis exercise that you led.

Sub Questions:

  • What had led to the need for the exercise?
  • How did you establish your role and how did you plan the exercise?
  • Where did you add the most value?
  • What worked well and what did you learn for the future?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when you challenged a well-established L&D or training practice.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the practice in place?
  • Why did you think it was necessary to challenge it?
  • How did you make the challenge?
  • What was your alternative solution?

 

Management Question Set

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Give us an example of where you managed the L&D budget planning process to prioritise L&D delivery.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the process?
  • How did you coordinate with the functional leadership of the business?
  • How did you balance priorities across different functions in terms of budget allocation?

 

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe within any organization as an example, how you evaluated the overall effectiveness of your L&D function within that organization?

Sub Questions:

  • What KPI’s did you put in place and how did you determine that they were appropriate measures?
  • What performance tracking and monitoring methods did you put in place?
  • How did you engage with the business leadership to gain their views?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when you delivered an L&D/training activity in-house, rather than outsource the provision.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the activity?
  • What were the options?
  • Why did you elect to deliver the activity in-house?
  • Through what measures did you evaluate your judgement after the event?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe an occasion when you were able to successfully argue a ‘value driven’ approach to an L&D solution in preference to a largely ‘cost driven’ solution to an identified need.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the training need identified?
  • What options were available?
  • How did you construct your supporting argument and who needed to be persuaded?
  • How did you demonstrate a return on investment?

HR Legal

MAIN QUESTION:

Please describe an occasion when your insight into employment law had a significant influence on the outcome of a situation.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the situation?
  • How did you evaluate matters to reach your viewpoint?
  • How did you seek to influence the situation?
  • What was the final outcome?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about an aspect of HR Policy change that you significantly influenced from a legislative perspective.

Sub Questions:

  • What aspect of HR Policy was in question?
  • What was your perspective?
  • How did you influence the situation?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a complex employee relations case where you were instrumental in managing it to a successful conclusion.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the nature of the case that made it complex?
  • What was your role or involvement?
  • What influence did you have?
  • What was the final outcome?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Please talk us through a situation where you were involved in managing an employee out of the business.

Sub Questions:

  • Why did the employee need to be managed out?
  • What was the position at the point you became involved?
  • How did you approach matters and what actions did you take?
  • What was the final outcome?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Describe a complex situation where you used your knowledge of employment law to influence the way in which a particular situation was handled.

Sub Questions:

  • What was going on in the business?
  • How did you see it from an employment law perspective?
  • How did you manage to influence the situation?
  • What was the outcome?

 

MAIN QUESTION:

Tell me about a time when you adopted a pragmatic approach to resolve a situation where that approach was in conflict with a purely law-based approach.

Sub Questions:

  • What was the situation?
  • What would have been the correct approach in law?
  • What approach did you actually adopt and why?
  • What was the outcome?